BIA - US Dept of the Interior - Indian Affairs Division of Tribal Govt Services

BIA - US Dept of the Interior - Indian Affairs Division of Tribal Govt Services

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1849 C Street, N.W., DOI - Asst Secretary, Washington, District Of Columbia 20240, United States
BIA - US Dept of the Interior - Indian Affairs Division of Tribal Govt Services
BIA - US Dept of the Interior - Indian Affairs Division of Tribal Govt Services
CLAIM & MANAGE THIS LISTING CLICK HERE ---> Claim it here!
Be the first to write a review

BIA - US Dept of the Interior - Indian Affairs Division of Tribal Govt Services

1849 C Street, N.W., DOI - Asst Secretary, Washington, District Of Columbia 20240, United States

About

About Us

Indian Affairs (IA) is the oldest agency of the United States Department of the Interior. Established in 1824, IA currently provides services (directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts) to approximately 1.9 million American Indians and Alaska Natives. There are 574 federally recognized American Indian tribes and Alaska Native Villages in the United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is responsible for the administration and management of 55 million surface acres and 57 million acres of subsurface minerals estates held in trust by the United States for American Indian, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives. Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) provides education services to approximately 42,000 Indian students. BIA and BIE’s missions are:

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) mission is to: "… enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives."

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) mission is to: "… provide quality education opportunities from early childhood through life in accordance with the tribes’ needs to cultural and economic well being in keeping with the wide diversity of Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages as distinct cultural and governmental entities. The Bureau considers the whole person (spiritual, mental, physical and cultural aspects.)"

REGARDING BIA DIRECTORY CONTENT 

Disclaimer: The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) first developed the Tribal Leaders Directory as an internal reference document for its employees. It quickly became one of Indian Affairs’ most requested documents, and is now used by federal, state and local governments, news media, businesses, researchers, and the general public as a resource to help them connect with Indian Country. The BIA’s commitment to enhanced communication led to transforming this publication into the electronic interactive app before you. It’s important to note that the Directory is not an official listing of federally recognized tribes. It should be used in conjunction with the Federal Register Notice of Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs (81 Fed. Reg. 26826), which is the official listing of all federally recognized tribes in the United States, pursuant to the Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994 (Pub. L. 103-454, 108 Stat. 4791-4792). Since tribal elections and other changes in tribal leadership occur throughout the year, the Directory’s information is the most currently available at the time of its most recent monthly update. Because the BIA cannot track all tribal leadership changes in real time, it does not guarantee the accuracy of the Directory’s tribal contact information. The reference map is also designed to reflect the general locations of BIA regional and agency offices and tribal government headquarters. The locations of tribal and federal offices shown in this map viewer are not to be used for legal purposes, and the BIA does not guarantee the accuracy of this information.

About Us

Indian Affairs (IA) is the oldest agency of the United States Department of the Interior. Established in 1824, IA currently provides services (directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts) to approximately 1.9 million American Indians and Alaska Natives. There are 574 federally recognized American Indian tribes and Alaska Native Villages in the United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is responsible for the administration and management of 55 million surface acres and 57 million acres of subsurface minerals estates held in trust by the United States for American Indian, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives. Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) provides education services to approximately 42,000 Indian students. BIA and BIE’s missions are:

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) mission is to: "… enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives."

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) mission is to: "… provide quality education opportunities from early childhood through life in accordance with the tribes’ needs to cultural and economic well being in keeping with the wide diversity of Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages as distinct cultural and governmental entities. The Bureau considers the whole person (spiritual, mental, physical and cultural aspects.)"

REGARDING BIA DIRECTORY CONTENT 

Disclaimer: The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) first developed the Tribal Leaders Directory as an internal reference document for its employees. It quickly became one of Indian Affairs’ most requested documents, and is now used by federal, state and local governments, news media, businesses, researchers, and the general public as a resource to help them connect with Indian Country. The BIA’s commitment to enhanced communication led to transforming this publication into the electronic interactive app before you. It’s important to note that the Directory is not an official listing of federally recognized tribes. It should be used in conjunction with the Federal Register Notice of Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive Services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs (81 Fed. Reg. 26826), which is the official listing of all federally recognized tribes in the United States, pursuant to the Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994 (Pub. L. 103-454, 108 Stat. 4791-4792). Since tribal elections and other changes in tribal leadership occur throughout the year, the Directory’s information is the most currently available at the time of its most recent monthly update. Because the BIA cannot track all tribal leadership changes in real time, it does not guarantee the accuracy of the Directory’s tribal contact information. The reference map is also designed to reflect the general locations of BIA regional and agency offices and tribal government headquarters. The locations of tribal and federal offices shown in this map viewer are not to be used for legal purposes, and the BIA does not guarantee the accuracy of this information.

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1849 C Street, N.W., DOI - Asst Secretary, Washington, District Of Columbia 20240, United States
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